Piano Chords - Minor 7th Chords - How to Figure Them out on a Piano | Descarga de MP4 o MP3 de YOUTUBE


Piano Chords - Minor 7th Chords - How to Figure Them out on a Piano


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Publicado: 2 years ago
Piano Chords - Minor Seventh Chords - How To Figure out Minor 7th Chords on a Piano
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuLu15WajqE

Take some piano lessons from Scott Houston “The Piano Guy.” In this video, Scott shows you how to figure out the notes in a Minor Seventh Chord on a piano, keyboard or organ.

Houston simply wants to help you teach yourself piano skills to get you having some fun at a piano as quickly as possible. He has had many folks ask him how to figure out what notes comprise a particular chord. Today, he will share his easy method with you.

In order to figure out the notes for any minor seventh chord, it’s important to realize that a piano half step (½ step) is the closest distance between any 2 keys. Piano half steps usually occur between a white to a black or a black to a white key. Once in a while, a half step can be from a white key to another white key.

Here’s how to figure out, step by step, which notes comprise a particular minor 7th chord. By working through two examples (C min 7 and a F# min 7 chord) you will learn the pattern to be able to figure out which notes comprise any minor 7th chord on your own.
The formula to use to figure out the notes that comprise a 7th chord is:   R-3–4-3.
In this formula, the “r” represents the “root” of the chord. The “root” is the note name. The numbers represent half steps counting from the root.

For example, to find a C min 7 (C minor 7th chord) you will start on the root (C). Count up 3 half steps to (Eb) and count up 4 more half steps to (G ) and finally 3 more half steps to (Bb). So, a C min 7 chord is comprised of a C, Eb, G and Bb.

Again, to find a F# min 7 (F sharp minor 7th chord) you will start on the root (F#). Count up 3 half steps to (A) and count 4 more half steps to (C#) and finally 3 more half steps to (E). So again, a F#m chord is composed of an F#,  A,  C# and E.

The Piano Guy also includes a link to access a free chord chart that you can print out as a handy chord chart guide.

http://pianoinaflash.com/free-piano-chord-formula-chart/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_term=Min7thChord&utm_content=viddescription&utm_campaign=sjhclips

Scott Houston is the host of The Piano Guy television series on Public Television and has taught hundreds of thousands of folks like yourself, how to have some fun on their piano or keyboard. He wants to help you get there too—as quickly as possible.

Sign Up Now For Scott's FREE Introductory Online Piano Course

Click here to sign up:

http://pianoinaflash.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_term=Min7thChord&utm_content=viddescription&utm_campaign=sjhclips

Scott "The Piano Guy" Houston, Emmy Award Winning Host
of The Piano Guy and Music Makers on Public Television

pianoinaflash.com
scotthouston.com
Facebook: facebook.com/ThePianoGuy

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuLu15WajqE
Piano Chords - Minor 7th Chords - How To Figure Them out on a Piano


comment  Comentarios

Is there a formula for 9th 11 and 13 chords? Thanks

9 months ago

You're welcome...

9 months ago

thank you so much!

9 months ago

9th= R-4-3-3-4 , Maj9 = R-4-3-4-3 , Min9th = R-3-4-3-4 Add another 3 on the end of those for all the 11ths, and add another -3-4 on the end of all those for the 13ths. Now having given all of those to you, understand that seldom if ever will you play those bigger chords "stacked" all the way from Root to the end like that, but that will give you the notes ... The trick on the bigger ones is to start using something called "voicings" that let you pick just certain chord tones to play vs. every one in a chord. That's too big a topic for this note though :-)

9 months ago

I was thinking like mm why he looks familiar?and I was like oh snap Steve Jobs!!Lol cool thanks for sharing your knowledge...

11 months ago

tee hee ...

11 months ago

thanks!!

1 year ago

You're welcome!

1 year ago

Great video Scott, I do have a request for a video if you ever get the chance: Nothing stomps me more than seeing an "add #" in a cheat sheet after a chord. I mean, I guess I can look thru my "The piano guys starter set," but it would be nice to see it briefly explain in a video.

Anyway, thanks for another awesome video.

2 years ago